Immigrants to Canada

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Canada Turns One

From the Illustrated London News of January 26, 1868.

"Dominion Day," July 1, was enthusiastically observed as a public holiday all over the Canadas, east and west. Picnics, bonfires, torchlight processions, and reviews of volunteers took place at various points, business was for a while suspended, and the people gave themselves up to relaxation and sport.

The local Government of Nova Scotia refused to allow the Queen's printer of the province, who is a member of the Dominion Parliament, to publish the proclamation of his Excellency the Governor-General enjoining the due observance of July 1 as the anniversary of the formation of the dominion of Canada. Thereupon the Administrator of the Government of the province published it upon his own authority, and caused it to be placarded throughout Halifax.

A private letter, from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, dated July 4, published in the New York papers, says that on "Dominion Day" there was no celebration, and that but two flags were displayed in the town. On Saturday, however, they celebrated July 4 by firing an American national salute of thirty-six guns at sunrise, noon, and sunset, and American flags were displayed all over the town.


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© Marjorie P. Kohli, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, 2000-2007
Last updated: February 15, 2007 and maintained by Marj Kohli