Immigrants to Canada

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Immigration Report of 1848

The following information was extracted from the British Parliamentary Papers, 1849, Session I, XXXVIII.

Enclosure in No. 1.

Summary of Chief Emigration Agent's Returns of Emigrants arrived at Ports of Quebec and Montreal.

From May 26 to June 17, 1848

Steerage Infants Cabin Total
From England 725 33 21 779
" Ireland 3,678 165 45 3,888
" Scotland 89 4 15 108
" Jersey 12 - 10 22
" Germany 415 15 - 430
" Lower Ports 172 2 4 178
  5,091 219 95 5,405
Previously reported 5,902 315 226 6,443
  10,993 534 321 11,848
To same period last year 21,553 1,438 56 23,047
Decrease in 1848 10,560 904 - 11,199

From June 17 to June 24, 1848

Steerage Infants Cabin Total
From Ireland 1,313 62 10 1,385
" Germany 306 17 3 326
" Lower Ports 37 3 - 40
  1,656 82 13 1,751
Previously reported 10,993 534 321 11,848
  12,649 616 334 13,599
To same period last year 28,830 1,910 95 30,835
Decrease in 1848 16,181 1,294 - 17,236

From June 24 to June 30, 1848

Steerage Infants Cabin Total
From England 496 20 18 534
" Ireland 927 48 8 983
" Scotland 399 10 - 409
" Germany 396 19 - 415
" Lower Ports 141 - - 141
  2,359 97 26 2,482
Previously reported 12,649 616 334 13,599
  15,008 713 360 16,081
To same period last year 36,579 2,386 130 39,095
Decrease in 1848 21,571 1,673 - 23,014

From June 30 to July 8, 1848

Steerage Infants Cabin Total
From England - - 8 8
" Ireland 1,307 49 14 1,370
" Scotland 321 14 12 347
" Germany 108 1 - 109
" Lower Ports 16 - - 16
  1,752 64 34 1,850
Previously reported 15,008 713 360 16,081
  16,769 777 394 17,931
To same period last year 45,608 2,868 192 48,668
Decrease in 1848 28,848 2,091 - 30,737

Gross Population of the Province of Canada West at several periods since 1824, taken from the printed Parliamentary Returns.

1824 151,097
1825 158,027
1830 210,437
1832 261,060
1834 320,692
1836 372,502
1839 407,515
1841 465,357
1842 486,055
1848 714,964

Previous to the year 1842 the census of Upper Canada was taken yearly, at the same time with the other assessments.

(No. 138.) No. 6

Copy of a Despatch from Governor-General the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine to Earl Grey.

Government House, Montreal, Nov. 13, 1848.
(Received December 5, 1848.)
My Lord,
I have the honour to transmit herewith a Return by the Chief Emigrant Agent of the Immigrants who arrived at Quebec from the 1st to the 31st of October last. The remarks appended to this return contain, as your Lordship will observe, some very severe reflections on the conduct of Captain McFie, of the brig "Ann," of Limerick, supported by affidavits. With the view of supplying your Lordship with all the information which I could procure on the case, I directed Mr. Buchanan to report whether he knew what had become of the captain, and whether any counter-statement respecting the occurrences in question had been made in his behalf. I enclose the copy of a letter written by him in reply to this inquiry.

I have, &c.,
(Signed) Elgin and Kincardine.
The Right Hon. Earl Grey,
&c. &c. &c.

Enclosure 2 in No. 6.

Extract of Remarks accompanying Chief Agent's Return for 31st October.

The "Princess Royal" and the "William" brought up the passengers per "Ann," from Limerick, taken from that vessel on the 23rd September, after she had been run foul of by the barque "Hampton," a homeward-bound vessel, near the island of Anticoste. These poor people arrived here with the loss of every article of clothing excepting what they had on their backs; and, from the statement made b them, I deemed it desirable that it should be supported by affidavits; two of which I herewith enclose, made by four of the passengers, being three who escaped on board the "Hampton," and one who came up in the "Princess Royal." From the statement made by these parties upon oath, as well as by the passengers generally, the conduct of the master of the "Ann," Captain McFie, is open to the severest censure; and there appears little doubt but that his desertion of the vessel has caused these poor people the loss of all their little property, as it does not appear that he made any attempt to ascertain the extent of the injury which his vessel had sustained; or, when an opportunity offered the next day, did he use the necessary exertion to regain his vessel and to attend to the lives and property of the unfortunate passengers who had been entrusted to his care.

It appears from the reports of several vessels which have arrived since at this port, that they fell in with the wreck of the "Ann" in the same state as when abandoned; and, by an extract from a Boston paper, it appears that the wreck was seen on the 3rd ult., 10 days after being abandoned, 30 miles N.W. from Cape George, Nova Scotia, apparently tight.

From all these circumstances it may be inferred that Captain McFie could not be over-desirous of saving his vessel, and doubtless she was well insured; and by not reaching this port he avoided the payment of upwards of 160l. head-money on his passengers.

Enclosure 3 in No. 6

Province of Canada, District of Quebec.
Personally came and appeared Patrick Halvey, Edmund Carmody, and James Gleeson, labourers, and being duly sworn upon the Holy Evangelists, deposeth and saith-That deponents were passengers on board the schooner "Ann," Archibald McFie, Master; they left Limerick bound for Quebec on the 17th day of August, 1848; nothing worthy of particular notice happened to the vessel or passengers till the night of the 22nd September,* [*The "Ann" being, as understand, not far from the island of Anticosti.-R.S., J.P.] when at about 11 o'clock, deponents were below in bed and asleep, and awoke by a noise as of something breaking upon deck which made a dreadful crash; on ascending to the deck we saw another vessel alongside our own; the first thing we heard was a voice, crying out to get on board the strange vessel as fast as we could, which we did as fast as possible, and succeeded in doing so with the greatest difficulty by jumping; up to this period we did not see or hear either the captain or mate of our own vessel, and we had been upwards of a quarter of an hour on board the strange vessel before we saw our captain in the cabin; we were crying and lamenting our fate when our mate told us not to be making a noise in the strange vessel.

We was ordered by the captain of the strange vessel to go to the forecastle, at the same time sending some canvass for us to lay upon. The crew of the strange vessel gave us some clothing was we had escaped from our vessel nearly naked; about six o'clock next morning the 23rd September we went on deck, we saw that the vessel we were on board of **[**And which we found to be named the "Hampton."-R.S., J.P.] was injured from the accident of last night; in a short time we saw our own vessel at a great distance, and we knew her by seeing the stump of the broken mast; we also saw another vessel approaching us; in about half an hour she came up to us, and proved to be the "Princess Royal," she was hailed by our own captain, and as far as we could understand, he requested her to proceed to the "Ann," and made motion with his hands towards the direction of our unfortunate vessel; in the course of the day we perceived that the "Princess Royal" had got up to the "Ann." Our captain told us that as soon as the "Hampton's" injury had been repaired (her bowsprit and bulwarks having been carried away) that she would bear down to the "Ann" also, and at about five o'clock in the afternoon we came within hail of her and saw no person on board; the "Hampton" then shaped her course to the eastward; we remained on board the "Hampton" for five days, and when to the eastward of St. Paul's Island we fell in with the ship "William," Captain T.L. Stewart, bound to Quebec; we were put on board the "William," and arrived at Quebec on the 4th instant. We declare that we received the kindest attention from the captain and crew of the "Hampton;" who administered to our wants, including several articles of clothing; and but for them we should have been wholly destitute of everything. We also state that Captain Stewart and crew of the "William" treated us with every possible kindness and attention.

We declare that neither Captain McFie or any of his officers and crew made the least exertion towards the preservation of the "Ann," and the passengers left on board at the time the collision took place; but as it appears to us, he and all belonging to the vessel sought their own safety without the slightest regard towards the preservation of the unfortunate passengers, who were abandoned to their fate in the night, and the vessel in a crippled condition; and it was not till the next day, as before stated, that Captain McFie took any steps towards the fate of his passengers. We are not aware whether any steps were taken by Captain McFie to ascertain whether his vessel was making water, but we firmly believe not, from the fact that his leaving the "Ann" immediately the vessels came together.

Further these deponents saith not, and hath signed.

his
Patrick + Halvey.
mark
(Signed) Edmond Carmody.
James Gleeson.

Sworn before me at the City of Quebec, this 5th day of October, 1848.
(Signed) R. Symes.

Enclosure 4 in No. 6.

Hugh Brereton, heretofore of Fairfield, county of Galway, in that part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain named Ireland, now in the city and district of Montreal, farmer, having been duly sworn upon the Holy Evangelist, deposeth and saith that-

I was a passenger on board the schooner "Ann," Captain McFie, which sailed from Limerick on the 17th August last. Nothing important occurred until the night of the 22nd of September, when, having reached the Gulf of St. Lawrence, between 11 and 12 o'clock, we suffered a collision with the barque "Hampton," outward bound. At this period the whole of the passengers, to the best of my knowledge, were in the steerage. When we heard the crash and the masts falling, we considered the ship was going to the bottom. I heard the cook say, "Damn you, lie quiet; there's no fear of you, all's right;" which words he uttered in consequence of a passenger asking him to be allowed to light a candle at his lantern, which the cook refused, putting out his own light at the same moment. He was standing on the main-hatchway, which otherwise, as well as the fore-hatchway, was covered with the wreck of the smashed boat, masts and rigging. He then went to the after-hatch, where the second mate was, and they spoke a few words to each other. At this time this hatch was nailed down by, it was believed by the other passengers and myself, the second mate. I feel certain that it was nailed down, because we heard the hammering; and when myself and another ascended the ladder we could not force it open; nor was it opened until I, with the assistance of a fellow-passenger, squeezed myself through an opening by the side of the hatch, where two boards had been missing for two days previously. When I got up I then, still with the assistance of the same fellow-passenger, Thomas Hannan [Haman?}, who pushed up from below, forced open the hatch by tearing it up; while this was happening, which altogether occupied but a few moments, the crew and some of the passengers, having ascended from the forecastle, were escaping on board the "Hampton."

I heard our own captain, when he was on board the strange vessel, say, "All come on board her," or words to that effect; but whether he used these words in reference to his crew or the passengers I cannot say. I went down immediately to hasten my father and family into the other ship to save their lives, and in the space of about 10 minutes I had them all on deck; but we were sadly disappointed when we found that the ship had removed from alongside, with our captain, sailors, and a few passengers, leaving us, viz., 104 souls, behind, to lament our fate, several of us being in the bows, loudly complaining to those in the other vessel, then parting, at being left to perish. At daylight I saw the "Hampton" about five miles off, and I believe anchored, especially as all her sails appeared to be close-reefed. She was to the windward of us; of this I am certain, as we all, in our anxiety, took particular notice of the direction of the wind, not knowing at the time that she was the vessel with which we had been in contact, but believing it to be one that might be likely to come to our assistance. The next object we saw was the brig "Hibernia," which came to us, when a conversation occurred between the captain and myself. He asked me what happened us, which I told him. He then asked where were our captain and crew. I told him that they had left us, and were then on board the vessel which struck us, and requested him the captain of the "Hibernia," to assist us. He said he would to the utmost of his power. I asked if he would take us on board, to which he questioned whither we were bound. I said Quebec. He said he was outward-bound, but that another vessel then in sight (which proved to be the "Princess Royal), and coming to us from the "Hampton," with the wind, was inward-bound, and would relieve us. "If it do not," he said, "I will, and will not leave you till I see you relieved," which he did not, but assisted with his boat, during five hours afterwards, the "Princess Royal" in taking us off. When the "Princess Royal" neared us the captain asked us a few questions, and then sent a boat to remove us, which was immediately followed by one from the "Hibernia." On different occasions of the boat of the "Princess Royal" coming to us, the men in her came on deck and one descended with me to the hold, and several of the crew while we were on board of this vessel coming to Quebec, complained at various times that the captain would not let five of them bring up the "Ann," by which they would have saved our luggage, and earned salvage for ourselves.

I have myself carefully read over my foregoing statement, and do declare it to be, to the best of my knowledge and belief, true in every particular and without the least exaggeration.
(Signed) Hugh Brereton.
Sworn before me, at Montreal aforesaid,
This twenty-first day of October, 1848.
(Signed) W. Ermatinger, J.P.

Enclosure 5 in No. 6.

Emigration Department, Quebec.
November 8, 1848.
Sir,
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of yesterday directing that I should inform you, for the information of his Excellency, whether any information had been received of Captain McFie, of the schooner "Ann," referred to in the Emigrant Return No. 11.

In reply I have the honour to state that from the particulars received from the passengers who escaped on board the "Hampton," with the captain and crew, that on their being put on board the "William," bound for this port, they understood the captain's intention was to proceed to England in the former vessel, she being bound to Grangemouth. No further accounts have been received since of him that I can learn.

The only counter statement which has appeared is a letter from Captain Duguid of the ship "Princess Royal," which expresses a doubt as to the correctness of the statement made by the passengers on their first arrival here, as to the securing of the hatches.

As his Excellency may not have observed the correspondence which was published on this subject, I herewith enclose a slip which I have cut from the newspapers. With respect to that part of Captain Duguid's second letter stating that none of his crew offered to bring up the wreck to Quebec, I can only say that two of them distinctly declared in my presence that they had offered to do so, which is also confirmed by the affidavit of Hugh Brereton, and which subsequently events prove might have been done with perfect safety.

I have, &c.,
(Signed) A.C. Buchanan, Chief Agent.
Major Campbell, Civil Secretary,

&c. &c. &c.

(No. 310.) No. 5.

Copy of a Despatch from Earl Grey to Governor-General the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine.

Downing-street, January 7, 1849.
My Lord,
I have the honour to acknowledge your Lordship's Despatch, No. 138, of the 13th of November last, enclosing the report of the Chief Emigrant Agent at Quebec for the month of October last.

I have perused with much regret the account of the abandonment of the brig "Ann," of Limerick, and of her passengers, by the master and crew, under circumstances which would appear to evince so much inhumanity. I enclose, for your Lordship's information, the copy of a letter which I caused to be addressed on the subject to the Secretary to the Committee of Lloyds, together with a copy of the reply, and I also transmit a report from the Colonial land and Emigration Commissioners, and its enclosure, containing such information as could be procured by their officer at Limerick. I fear that there is nothing more which it remains in the power of Government to do, although the case appears highly discreditable to the private parties in charge of this vessel.

I have, &c.,
(Signed) Grey.
The Right Hon. The Earl of Elgin and Kincardine.
&c. &c. &c.

Enclosure 1 in No. 5

Downing-street, December 7, 1848.
Sir,
I am directed by Earl Grey to transmit to you, for the information of the Committee of Lloyds, the enclosed copy of a Despatch from the Governor-General of Canada, together with its enclosures, relating to the abandonment of the brig "Ann" of Limerick, and of her passengers, by the master and crew, under circumstances which, unless they have been altogether misrepresented, would appear to show not only that the vessel and property were deserted without sufficient cause, but also that great inhumanity was practised towards the passengers. Lord Grey has thought it his duty to communicate these papers without delay to the Committee of Lloyds, both with a view to their information, and also in order that this evidence might be available in any inquiry which the Committee may have occasion to make into the circumstances of a case which, as far as it is yet known, appears to reflect such grave discredit on the parties concerned in ti.
I have, &c.,
(Signed) H. Merivale
The Secretary to Lloyds,
&c. &c.

Enclosure 2 in No. 5.

Lloyds, December 14, 1848.
Sir,
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 7th inst., transmitting, by direction of Earl Grey, copy of a Despatch from the Governor-General of Canada together with its enclosures, relating to the abandonment of the brig "Ann," of Limerick, and of her passengers, by the master and crew, after she had been run foul of off the Island of Anticosti, and to acquaint you that it has been laid before the Committee for managing the affairs of Lloyds, who have instructed me to state, for the information of his Lordship, that they have taken every means of giving publicity to them, by placing them in the reading-room of this establishment for the information of parties interested, and the guidance of the underwriters when called upon for the settlement of the loss.

I am further to beg that you will express the thanks of the Committee to Lord Grey for the favour of the communication.

I have, &c.,
(Signed) J.W.A. Halsted, Secretary.
Herman Merivale, Esq.,
&c. &c.

Enclosure 3 in No. 5.

Colonial Land and Emigration Office,
January 2, 1849.
Sir,
With reference to your letter of the 12th ult., transmitting to us Mr. Buchanan's report for the month of October, in which he described the abandonment of the emigration ship "Ann" in the Gulf of St. Lawrence by her master and crew, we have the honour to submit for Lord Grey's information the copy of a letter from our emigration officer at the port of Limerick, to whom we communicated an extract of Mr. Buchanan's report. We beg to add that as this is not the first occasion on which unfavourable reports have been received of vessels despatched by the same owner, we have directed Lieut. Lynch to be in future especially vigilant in regard to any vessels which may be chartered by that gentleman.

We have, &c.,
(Signed) T.W.C. Murdoch.
C.Alexander Wood.
Herman Merivale, Esq.,
&c. &c.


Government Emigration Office, Limerick,
December 26, 1848.
Sir,
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 19th inst., with an extract of a Despatch from the Governor-General of Canada, respecting the unaccountable conduct of the master and crew of the schooner "Ann" of this port, by deserting that vessel and passengers near the Island of Anticosti on the 23rd September last. I called on the owner, Mr. David Bannatyne, and in obedience to your instructions communicated to him Mr. Buchanan's report. Bannatyne said that he has had letters from McFie, late master of the "Ann." He thought his vessel was sinking at the moment she came in contact with the barque "Hampton," that he lost all his property, having left everything on board. The next day he could not get a boat from the master of the barque to go to his own vessel; that after repairing damages the "Hampton" ascertained that all the passengers were taken out of the "Anne."

Such is Mr. Bannatyne's account, which he says can be proved.

I have, &c.,
(Signed) Richard Lynch
S. Walcott, Esq.,
&c. &c.

(No. 325.) No. 6.

Copy of a Despatch from Earl Grey to Governor-General the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine.

Downing-street, February 6, 1849.
My Lord,
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Lordship's Despatch, No. 146, of the 6th of December last, relative to the application made on behalf of the owners of the barque "Lord Sandon" for remission of a penalty of 40l, imposed under a provincial enactment, for not having on board a certified list of his passengers,[sic]

Having referred this subject to the Colonial Land and Emigration Commissioners, I transmit herewith a copy of their report; and I think that your Lordship will probably concur in the propriety of acting on the views which they offer upon the case.

I have, &c.,
(Signed) Grey.
The Right Hon. The Earl of Elgin and Kincardine,
&c. &c. &c.

Enclosure in No. 7

Colonial Land and Emigration Office,
January 31, 1849.
Sir,
We have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant, accompanied by a Despatch from the Governor-General of Canada, enclosing two applications made to him on behalf of the owners of the barque "Lord Sandon" for the remission of a fine of 40l. imposed on him for not having on board a certified list of passengers.

2. Before reporting on this case we thought it necessary to make a reference on the subject to the emigration officer at Cork, and we enclose a copy of the answer received from him. It appears that the master of the "Lord Sandon" cleared from Cork with 16 passengers on board, the largest number which (she being 407 tons burthen) he would have been entitled to carry without taking a certified passenger list; that, however, he took on board at Cork, as steerage passengers, 20 persons; and that accordingly, on his arrival at Quebec, a fine of 40l. was inflicted on him on account of his not having such a list. It will be seen from Lieutenant Friend's report, and the list which accompanies it, that the 20 persons shipped at Cork amounted to only 16 "passengers," and he suggests that possibly the distinction between persons and "passengers," in the legal sense of the term, may have been overlooked in this case. This explanation appears to us probable; and if it be correct, the owners of the "Lord Sandon" ought, of course, to be relieved from the fine erroneously imposed on them. If, however, it be not so, and that the master of the "Lord Sandon" did actually embark more passengers than he had cleared for, there would, we think, be no grounds for remitting the penalty, the express object of which is to prevent the occurrence of such cases.

We have, &c.,
(Signed) T.W.C. Murdoch.
C. Alexander Wood.
Herman Merivale, Esq.,
&c. &c. &c.


Government Emigration Office, Cove,
January 25, 1849.
Sir,
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, with the enclosed papers, which I now return.

The "Lord Sandon" sailed from Cork during my absence on leave in July, but I find, on reference, that the reported 23 persons equal to 16 passengers on board; but, on further inquiry, learn that she actually only carried 20 persons, equal to 16 adult passengers, as will appear by the accompanying list. If the master carried over this number he deserves the penalty; but I think the question will be found to rest on the ages of children, and that the fine was probably imposed in consequence of the master reporting 20 passengers, instead of 20 persons, equal to 16 passengers; and I have no doubt but, on further inquiry, this will be proved to have been the case. There is only one in the list whose age approaches 14 years in which a mistake could have taken place.

I have, &c.,
(Signed) Charles Friend.
S. Walcott, Esq.
&c. &c.


Passenger List of "Lord Sandon," Bowman, Master, for Quebec, July 19, 1848.

Names Ages Adults Children
Michael Roche 22 1 -
Margaret Roche 21 1 -
James Barry 25 1 -
Catherine Barry 4 - 1
Mary Barry 3 - 1
Daniel Farrelly 36 1 -
Peggy Farrelly 27 1 -
John Farrelly 3 - 1
Bridget Relihan 45 1 -
Dennis Relihan 20 1 -
Nelly Relihan 16 1 -
Timothy Relihan 13 - 1
Peggy Relihan 10 - 1
Johannah Relihan 7 - 1
Michael Relihan 4 - 1
John Smith 22 1 -
Michael Murphy 19 1 -
Mary Donohoe 35 1 -
Eliza Corney 28 1 -
Ellen Corney 10 - 1
  - 12 8
12 adults, 8 children equal to 16 statute adults.


(No. 327.) No. 8.

Copy of a Despatch from Earl Grey to Governor-General the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine.

Downing-street, February 9, 1849.
My Lord,
I transmit for your information the copy of a report which has been received by the Emigration Commissioners from the emigration officer at Cork, and I have to desire that you will communicate this information to your Executive Council, as showing the importance to the trade of the province of not making the regulations to which emigrants' ships are subjected more severe than is absolutely requisite in order to guard against a recurrence of the evils formerly experienced.

I have, &c.,
(Signed) Grey.
The Right Hon. The Earl of Elgin and Kincardine,
&c. &c. &c.

Enclosure in No. 8

Government Emigration Office, Cove,
January 31, 1849.
Sir,
I beg herewith to forward the cost of passages for the ensuing season. The passenger brokers have informed me that there is every prospect of a large emigration to the United States this season, but that to North American Colonies will be very small. Indeed there is no intention at present to charter any vessels for them. The heavy tax on emigrants seems quite to have driven emigration to the United States. It is expected that small farmers and tradesmen will compose the majority this year.

I have, &c.,
(Signed) Charles Friend, R.N.,
Emigration Officer.
S. Walcott, Esq.,
&c. &c.


Place Cabin Intermediate
Usual Cost of Passage Cabin, whether fitted or not Articles found by Ship Usual Cost of Passage with Provisions Usual Cost of Passage without Provisions Cabin, whether fitted or not Articles found by the Ship
New York 10l. to 15l. Fitted Cabin fare 6l. 5l. Berth only Fuel, water, 1 lb. bread, and 10 lbs. meat
New Orleans " " " 6l. 5l. " "
Quebec " " " 6l. 5l. " Fuel, water, and 1 lb. bread
New Brunswick " " " 6l. 5l. " "
Halifax " " " 6l. 5l. " "
Texas 20l. to 30l.

Same as

"

in London

"





or Liverpool

16l.





vessels.

10l.





None

"





direct from

"





this port.

West Indies
Falkland Islands
Cape of Good Hope
Mauritius
Ceylon
Hong Kong
Australia
New Zealand

Place Steerage.

Usual length of Passage
Usual season of Sailing To what destination do the greater number of Emigrants go fro Is it usual to carry intermediate Passengers
Usual Cost of Passage with Provisions Usual Cost of Passage without Provisions Berth, whether fitted or not What can an Emigrant Victual himself for Articles found by the Ship
New York 5l. 10s. 4l. Berth only 20s. to 30s. Fuel water, 1 lb. bread-stuffs, and 10 lbs. meat 40 All the year. New York and Boston No
New Orleans " 3l. 5s. " " " 40 October to May No
Quebec " 4l. " " Fuel, water, and 1 lb. bread 45 Spring and summer months No
New Brunswick " 4l. " " " 40
Halifax " 4l. " " " 40
Texas Same as in London or Liverpool vessels. None direct from this port.
West Indies
Falkland Islands
Cape of Good Hope
Mauritius
Ceylon
Hong Kong
Australia
New Zealand


Children, 1 to 14 years, 3l.; Infants under 1 year, 1l.

Government Emigration Office, Cove,
January 30, 1849.
(Signed) Charles Friend, R.N.
Emigration Officer.


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